Seaweed on Gress Beach

Okay. It is not couth to open a blog by saying, ‘I am, like, such a bad blogger.’ Just like it is inadvisable to begin a speech or a reading or an argument with a self-conscious disclaimer. Nevertheless. Here I be. I have not written for a donkey’s age – has it been lack of will? Sort of. A dearth of time? Yeah, that too. An overwhelm of… life? Yep. Never mind. I’m here now.

I’m here – on the Isle of Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides, where I’m living (temporarily) with my husband and two daughters. We have extended family here, which was part of the impetus for the move. But also, the place is infectious (in the way of laughter, not disease) and previous visits convinced us we needed to spend more time getting to know the Hebridean way.

We arrived in January and toughed it out through the darkness and the gales, and are now reveling in the sweet air and endless skies of spring on the island. There are lambs everywhere. Sometimes the lambs do that thing you read about in books – they gambol!

As part of my stay I have had the pleasure of teaching a group of keen and good-humoured writers at An Lanntair, the fabulous, multi-faceted arts centre in Stornoway. One of my students, and a new pal and half marathon training buddy (gack!) wrote about the class on her wonderful blog Hebrides Writer. I have also had to opportunity to connect with some fine writers at Catch 23, a warm and welcoming drop-in centre for those living with mental illness.

Living in the country has made me very good at shouting at dogs and noticing the way moss pokes its way up through fence posts. I have always been good at spotting birds; now that spring is here it seems they are forever trembling and soaring at the edge of my vision. Winter forced a slow-down; I started knitting and sinking into the warmth at the peat fireside. I am writing, but perhaps more importantly, reading with a less cluttered mind. I love the way my children take to the outdoors. They play on the beach and in the croft with both abandon and childlike care, collecting and building and taking off after movement and colour. I am drinking a lot of tea.

Also trying to be looser and more forgiving of myself and the world. My friend Kerry Clare wrote about this in a recent blog post: ‘In Praise of Messy Blogging‘.(I also have a guest post — an update to my M Word essay – featured there.) One of my hesitations around blogging has always been that I have difficulty teasing different strands of my life away from each other – they are all so gloriously and complicatedly tangled. How to write about one thing and not the other? Maybe stop trying.

(Oh, and also – how could I forget? – at the beginning of my stay here I got to collaborate on an illustrated story with the LA-based collage artist India Brookover through the nifty folks at 7 x 7.

 

She passed me an image through the glory of the internet and I passed her back some text — and so on… We had time and word limits, but were otherwise free to follow our whims and weirdnesses. We were working with a 12 hour time difference; she was in a big American city, I was on a remote Scottish island. We have never met. It was such fun; I miss it!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding the Interesting

And didn’t it always go like that – body parts not quite lining up the way you wanted them to, all of it a little bit off, as if the world itself were an animated sequence of longing and envy and self-hatred and grandiosity and failure and success, a strange and endless cartoon loop that you couldn’t stop watching, because, despite all you knew by now, it was still so interesting.

— Meg Wolitzer, The Interestings

 

I have had a difficult fall, wherein I did feel, most of the time, that I was falling, or off balance, or already fallen.  I spent some time in the hospital, learning the great value of psychiatric nurses.  Post-partum depression, anxiety, OCD, you name it – and it is important to name it isn’t it, considering the stigma that still exists around mental illness…  The world cracked me open.  I was too broken to find my way back to all the good and bad and in-between people in it.  Until I wasn’t – a blessed combination of medication, insight and love (wise words of Andrew Solomon from his wonderful book The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression) and oh, humour, humour is BIG (I love, love, love Maria Bamford!) – until I was remarkably, thankfully, returned to a ragged kind of wholeness.  And what seems so miraculous now, so noteworthy, is my interest in life, in all its stupid, shining, circuitous goings-on.  I am grateful (and still somewhat amazed) that it is ‘so interesting’ once again.

One of the things that is interesting to me these days is how many people were so incredibly compassionate towards me while I was sick – and that sometimes this compassion came from the most unlikely quarters.   I’m thinking of you, grouchy pharmacist lady I had written off as hostile, who looked me square in the eye and said, ‘It’s such a struggle, isn’t it?’ beaming goodwill and true fellow-feeling.

And so much of that compassion involved people willing to hear my story and to share their own.  Which is why I am so excited that The M Word, edited by Kerry Clare, is closer and closer to becoming a book.  This collection of conversations about motherhood tackles some hard truths, from many different angles.  When I was in the thick of my crisis, I felt embarrassed by my contribution to the anthology – although it outlines some of my struggles with new motherhood, it was written from a place of strength.  It has a happy ending.  I was ashamed that my relationship to motherhood had once again become so challenging, so darkly complex.  I felt like a fake.  But that of course is the point, I think, of my essay, and of the collection as a whole.  When it comes to mothering the answers are myriad, and the right answer today is seldom the right answer tomorrow.  You can pre-order a copy of The M Word now.

Also interesting, and incredibly sad to me, is the recent death of Nelson Mandela.  I was lucky enough to be in the same room with him in 1990, at a Toronto high school, with 1500 other students.  It was four months after he had been released from prison and he had asked to speak to the young people of the city.  People rose to their feet, chanting and singing, when he entered.  The atmosphere in the room was electrifying.  It is one of the most pivotal and galvanizing memories of my life.  The idea of revolution fascinates me – and I am always so inspired to encounter individuals who manage to combine love and understanding of their fellow humans with a strong conviction that change MUST occur.  I am still working on how to integrate these ideals into my own life, and I am wrestling with the concept of revolution and the effect of large social movements on individuals and families in the novel I am working on.  Yet another arena of my life and thinking where I have very few answers – but I keep working on it…  Goodbye Nelson Mandela.  I feel so fortunate to be part of your legacy.

Finally, I am so pleased that my dear friend Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer’s newest novel is set to make its way into the world soon.  The book is called All the Broken Things, and it is absolutely lovely, full of yearning and intimate history – and bear wrestling!  It tells the story of Bo, one of the Vietnamese boat people, and his complicated relationship to his family and his new home.  Kathryn’s mechanic’s daughter, a 15-year-old hugely talented artist/filmmaker named Carol Nguyen, made a book trailer that captures the mood of the story perfectly.  You can watch the trailer here.  Please do!  And seek out the book!

Okay, that’s me blogged out likely for the next few months.  All best for the holidays, friends.  And here’s to a brighter and shinier 2014 (although I will try to enjoy the dull bits too…)!

 

 

The Mad Tour Continues!

I will admit to experiencing a bit of Mad Hope hangover.  I’m happy to be meeting readers, whether virtual or, um, human.  But life with two small children is busy and dervish-like and fulfilling and frustrating — and the children, thankfully, do not (often) truck with the literati.  So there are two worlds spinning around and inside me.  And sometimes they clash and sometimes they just whizz way too fast so that when I lie down in my bed at night — even though the baby is sleeping through the night (She really is!  I’ve said it aloud a few times now to no discernible/deleterious effect.) — I can’t sleep.  And in the day I often have the sensation of being asleep with my eyes open.

Photo Credit: Zara Rafferty

But the best kind of antidote to any kind of hangover has got to be the gals over at the Keepin’ It Real Book Club.  They reviewed Mad Hope, in a live video, in 140 seconds.  The review is fab (Feel the Mad Hope!), but their connection and banter also remind me of a wonderful pre-partner and kids period; time and space for long exchanges with close girlfriends, finishing and hijacking each other’s sentences, reading and talking about books in a manner I now know to be luxurious and productive and free.  Go check out their vids!

In the last couple of weeks, Lindsay Reeder at Reeder Reads also showed MH some love, and I got the chance to hold forth on the short story form over at The Danforth Review and tell everybody about my favourite colour, how I want to die, and why I hate shrimp in the Proust Questionnaire at Open Book.

Also, here are some photos from the Indie Lit Night in Waterloo.  That drink — cursed, beautiful thing — is called Mad Hope in a Glass and it was conceived by bookseller extraordinaire Caroline Wesley (of Waterloo’s Words Worth Books).  The green thing on the side, perched next to the lime, is a gummy frog!  And that’s me and Carrie Snyder, lookin’ like ladies on the lam from the fams.

Happy Harbourfront!

On April 11th (my birthday!) I had the great good fortune of reading at Harbourfront as part of their weekly reading series.  I was joined by fellow writers Yejilde Kilanko and John Boyne and Catherine Bush (a friend and former thesis advisor) hosted.  It was pretty darn perfect — reading a story (that I wrote!) to a room full of people who were really listening.  On my birthday.  C’mon.

 

 

Here are some pictures.  The smiling woman behind me brandishing my book is my Auntie Ann.  But for the purposes of this blog, she is a stranger.  Hear that?  Complete stranger.  Fan?  Oh, what a fan.